The Science Of Love

<script async src=”//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js“></script>
<!– taw-responsive –>
<ins class=”adsbygoogle”
     style=”display:block”
     data-ad-client=”ca-pub-3446446293618986″
     data-ad-slot=”1428227755
     data-ad-format=”auto”></ins>
<script>
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
</script>

It looked like just another day. The scientist sipped his glass of Dihydrogen oxide warmed slightly above the ambient temperature by precisely seven degrees. In his mind dozens of formulae convoluted and condensed like chromosomes do during cell division. To a normal eye, he stared at the canteen wall like a retard.

 

Then, the new recruit walked in. She carried a fragrance with her which diffused through the canteen air to involuntarily tantalize the receptors of the scientist’s nose. The structure of the ester filled his mind all of a sudden, and the branching of the Carbons looked way sexier than Mrs. Samantha from laundry service had looked all her life. All neurons had communally declared shunning science for a moment to adore the science that had walked in the room.

<script async src=”//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js“></script>
<!– taw_display2 –>
<ins class=”adsbygoogle”
     style=”display:block”
     data-ad-client=”ca-pub-3446446293618986″
     data-ad-slot=”7509420951
     data-ad-format=”auto”></ins>
<script>
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
</script>

His heart had always been like a black body. It received a lot, and emitted all of it, retaining none. That made him fall in and out of love, but never rise in it. And now she walked in, and he swore to Einstein, that this was the most beautiful arrangements of atoms his eyes had ever seen. And all the neurons exclaimed ‘Amen’ in unison.

 

He adjusted the focus of his personally engineered spectacles to get a glimpse of what the badge on her chest read. ‘Doctor Irwin,’ he whispered and his mind danced like popcorn on hot fire. It immediately reminded him of Erwin Schrodinger, the guy who gave the uncertainty principle, which seemed to remarkably describe his heart at that moment. Erwin was also now his new favorite scientist, toppling Einstein whom he had just sworn upon. ‘Irwin must really love cats,’ he giggled.

 

That night, all science seemed to decipher his heart so well. His heart had been a black hole with everything lost in its darkness. Yet, she had managed to pierce him through,like the alpha particles tunnel out mysteriously surpassing the barrier. He slept with the dreams of her perfume’s structures, smiling as the dangling bonds tickled the dendrons of his neurons.

 

A scientist had fallen in love. And this wasn’t magic, but science

 


Image Courtesy: www.pixabay.com


<script src=”//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js” async=””></script>
 <ins class=”adsbygoogle” style=”display: block;” data-ad-format=”autorelaxed” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-3446446293618986″ data-ad-slot=”1246221352“></ins>
<script>// <![CDATA[
     (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
// ]]></script>

 

 

Share With Friends