Solstice

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What a lovely cold winter night it was.

 

She, being her usual self, the independent and strong-headed girl, was in a train at ten in the night, all by herself at New Delhi railway station. She was going home after three months. She had worked on Diwali too that year. God bless America you see. But then came the much awaited ten-days leave and she had promised her to make the most out of it.

 

Her bags were packed and so was her mind, with thoughts. She would go to the school she spent all her school years in, meet all the teachers and all the old friends. She was going to visit some relatives as her mother insisted; she knew what was happening. Her parents had fixed her marriage in few months and to be honest, she was okay with it. It was not like she loved someone else anyway. She had always thought that her parents would choose the best man for her.

 

It was a funny date as well. Not because of some stupid numerical reasons but because the world was gripped with a strange and unusual fear. The fear of the end of the world! 21stDecember, 2012 was the date and the Mayan prophecy, the reason.

 

She didn’t believe in this, still, somewhere, she wished it was true. Delhi was in the shadows of one of the most heinous crimes that had ever been recorded, and humanity was humiliated wide open. She wanted the world to end; even if it means that she would never be able to experience true love. Nothing else mattered.

 

“Hi! Is that seat empty? Do you mind?”

 

That was when she saw him. Sitting on her berth lost in her thoughts, she didn’t even realize when he came.

 

Call it destiny, call it karma, or call it something else. They were going to the same city, in the same train, and they were the only two people in that compartment.

 

Winters are not good times for travelling to a chilly place like her hometown.

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Talks started, from the book she was reading to the music he was listening to; from the college she attended to the company he owned.

 

The list was long, and so was the night. Exceptionally long.

 

They reached the station the next morning. None had slept, not even for one second.

 

Her parents had come to receive her, and were shocked to see whom she was with.

 

She was shocked to know who he was.

 

He wasn’t.

 

His parents were a bit more hurried than hers. He had seen her picture.

 

Today, exactly a year after that eventful night, she waits for him to put the ring on her finger. She knows why that night was special.

 

Winter Solstice was the term Google had used to describe this day, the shortest day and the longest night of the year.

 

The world had not ended that day, and hers had only begun.

 

 


Image Source: pixabay.com


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