Bubbles

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There are a few moments in life which tug at the ends of your heart and induce a churning sensation in your stomach. One of those is your five year old daughter asking you the reason why you divorced her father. I cannot just tell her that our relationship was on its death bed for the past couple of years. I could not bring myself to tell her that I had tried to revive our relationship, but all my tries seemed futile when he confessed about being in love with another woman. I could not tell her how my world, which was once so vibrant, now bore likeness to one of those gnarly trees devoid of leaves, which stand in solitude in the backyards of people’s houses.

 

Ria’s warm fingers entwined with mine brought me back to the question which she had thrown at me a couple of minutes ago, ” Ma, why did you dih-vorse Pa?”
We were on one of our regular evening strolls through the neighbourhood park, where Ria chased butterflies and played with bubbles, while I sat on a bench, smiling at her pristine innocence.
“I will tell you the answer a while later, baby.” I told her.
I watched her tiny frame as she stood by the swings waiting for her turn to come, with her elated eyes following the to and fro movement of the swings.

 

I tried phrasing the answers in my head.
“Ria, Pa and Ma did not love each other anymore.”
No. This would lead to questions on love.
“Things don’t work after a certain time, sweetheart.”
No. Then Ria would want to know if after a certain time, things would not work out between us too.
I scratched off every answer that I had tried to come up with and sat back, looking at the tiny bubbles some other kid had been blowing into the air.

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A little while later, I smiled. I had come up with an answer and I hoped it would appeal to the mind of a five-year old. When Ria came running back to me with a satiated smile etched on her lips after playing on the swing, I tried converting my thoughts into words in order to explain her about her Ma and Pa’s divorce.

 

“Ria,” I began,” Look at those bubbles.” I said, pointing towards the bubbles floating in the air around us.
She started looking at them intently and then shifted her gaze back to me.
“Two persons in love are like two bubbles. When two bubbles try to merge together, either they form a bigger bubble or both of them burst. Likewise, if those two persons truly love each other, they can form a bigger and better world for themselves. If not, then their relationship breaks. It does not last. This is what happened with Ma and Pa, baby.”

 

I looked at her to see if she could comprehend whatever I had tried conveying to her. She stared intently at the bubbles for a while. Then she turned to me with satisfaction in her eyes, and with a smile she said, “You and I would form a bigger bubble together.”

 


Image Courtesy: www.pixabay.com


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